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Young Ninja Group (ages 3-5)

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Baseball Fantasy


RotoWire provides millions of annual users with the latest fantasy sports, daily fantasy sports, and sports betting news, information, tools, and more. RotoWire provides real-time player news and notes across dozens of sports, as well.




baseball fantasy



RotoBaller has assembled a list of daily MLB injury updates to help you prepare both your seasonal and daily fantasy baseball (DFS) lineups, every day of the MLB season. Below is our updated list of injured MLB players for March 30th, 2023. Only players on teams that are scheduled to play today will appear below... Read More


Relief pitcher can be the most volatile position in fantasy baseball. Players can lose their roles due to inefficiency, the emergence of a teammate, or the manager having different ideas than you thought they would. Whatever the reason, saves can be tough to predict. That's why finding a closer in your draft who has better-than-average... Read More


Welcome to the latest edition of our dynasty fantasy baseball prospects rankings and the 2023 season. In this article below you'll see our final preseason list of the top 250 MLB prospect rankings for fantasy baseball dynasty leagues, including both hitters and pitchers. Although this is the final update of Spring Training, these rankings will... Read More


Most fantasy drafts have been completed by now, as Opening Day for the 2023 season starts Thursday. Pitching prospects can emerge to become fantasy aces and are worth taking a chance on later in the drafts or picking up through free agency. Prospects can provide a boost to fantasy managers' teams later in the season,... Read More


Most fantasy drafts have been completed by now, as Opening Day for the 2023 season starts Thursday. Hitter prospects can emerge to become fantasy superstars and are worth taking a chance on later in the drafts or picking up through free agency. Prospects can provide a boost to fantasy managers' teams later in the season,... Read More


Welcome to the 2023 MLB regular season! The 162-game grind is upon us and I'm thrilled to be working with RotoBaller delivering free MLB bets this season! I've been handicapping baseball for more than a decade and certainly looking forward to a profitable season ahead! Attention fellow sports bettors! We have some exciting news to... Read More


Bold predictions can be the key to fantasy seasons. Predicting players who will outperform or underperform expectations by extreme amounts can win leagues. Bold predictions can also be entirely unhelpful, speculative thoughts that are just fun to consider. At the end of the day, the BOLD factor of these articles should not take away from the analysis.... Read More


In fantasy sports, we're always chasing the young, upstart prospect. It's why the ADPs for guys like Anthony Volpe and Jordan Walker have been climbing in recent weeks. However, the consequence of this is that other talented young players often get forgotten about. Today we're going to try and rectify that. However, we're also going... Read More


"Selling high" is often misconstrued as selling at the absolute peak of value in fantasy baseball. That itself is difficult to gauge, especially for a contender who would prefer to reap the benefits of that peaking player. Selling high can sometimes just mean selling a good player in the offseason while they are perceived as... Read More


RotoBaller has offered several sets of interactive cheat sheets and draft tools in the past to help fantasy baseball managers prepare for their drafts and the upcoming season. Just in time for the regular season, we have an updated Risers/Fallers Draft Prep Tool! A special shout out to Connelly Doan for building out this Draft... Read More


Buying in a dynasty baseball league is a tricky needle to thread. If done right, it can help build a consistent winner with players churned and burned. Buying "low" is often perceived as buying currently injured or struggling players but that is oftentimes foolish as it can burst in your face. Taking an offseason to... Read More


Bold predictions can be the key to fantasy seasons. Predicting players who will outperform or underperform expectations by extreme amounts can win leagues. Bold predictions can also be entirely unhelpful, speculative thoughts that are just fun to consider. And the latter is what these ones are! Sort of. I'm not going to tell you I think... Read More


The MLB offseason and Spring training are officially over. The regular season is here, and with it comes the daily influx of baseball news that fantasy managers have missed in the last few months. Lineup news, actual games happening, constant waiver wire moves, pitching assignments, and bullpen usage. Baseball is back, and so too is... Read More


Fantasy baseball is a game in which the participants serve as owners and general managers of virtual baseball teams. The competitors select their rosters by participating in a draft in which all relevant Major League Baseball (MLB) players are available. Fantasy points are awarded in weekly matchups based on the actual performances of baseball players in real-world competition. The game typically involves MLB, but can also involve other leagues, such as American college baseball, or leagues in other countries, such as the KBO League.


Throughout his life, author Jack Kerouac played his own form of fantasy baseball, in which he created completely fictitious teams, players, and statistics. Kerouac's fantasy baseball records included charts, sketches, and notes on each of his created teams.[1]


The history of fantasy baseball games can be traced back to the 19th century. The tabletop game Sebring Parlor Base Ball, introduced in 1866, allowed participants to simulate games by propelling a coin into slots on a wooden board.[2] Later games featured outcomes determined by dice rolls or spinners, and some were endorsed by professional ballplayers.[2] In 1930, Clifford Van Beek designed the board game National Pastime, which contained customized baseball cards of MLB players.[2] After rolling a pair of dice, participants would consult the card of the MLB player "at bat" to determine an outcome, which could range from a single, double, triple, or home run to a strikeout, putout, walk, or error. Players with better statistics in the previous season were more likely to receive favorable outcomes; this allowed National Pastime to become one of the first games to attempt to accurately simulate the performances of real-life MLB players.[2]


A notable example of such games was APBA, which was first released in 1951 and also contained cards of MLB players with in-game outcomes correlated to their stats from past seasons. Participants could compose fantasy teams from the cards and play against each other or attempt to re-create previous seasons using the statistics on the cards.[3] Individual player cards and dice roll simulations were also emulated in the Strat-O-Matic game, which was first released in 1961.[4] Daniel Okrent, who would later be credited with developing modern fantasy baseball, was an avid Strat-O-Matic player, telling Sports Illustrated in 2011 that "if there hadn't been Strat-O-Matic, I still think I would have come up with rotisserie, but unquestionably it helped."[4]


In 1961, another early form of fantasy baseball was coded for the IBM 1620 computer by John Burgeson, then working for IBM.[5] A user would select a team from a limited roster of retired players to play against a team randomly chosen by the computer. The computer would then use random number generation and player statistics to simulate a game's outcome and print a play-by-play description of it.[5][7] The game was coded for a computer with only 20 KB of computer memory and was entirely self-contained. In the fall of 1961, Rege Cordic, a KDKA (Pittsburgh) radio personality, produced a radio show based on the program.[5]


Modern fantasy baseball was developed and popularized in the 1980s by a group of journalists who created Rotisserie League Baseball in 1980. The league was named after the New York City restaurant La Rotisserie Française, where its founders met for lunch and first played the game.[8] Magazine writer-editor Daniel Okrent is credited with introducing the rotisserie league concept to the group and inventing the scoring system.[9][10] Players in the Rotisserie League drafted teams of active MLB players and tracked their statistics during the season to compile their scores.[10] Like the Baseball Seminar league, rather than using statistics for seasons whose outcomes were already known to simulate in-game outcomes, team owners would have to make predictions about the statistics that MLB players would accumulate during the upcoming season. The success or failure of a particular fantasy team would therefore depend on the real-life performance of its players rather than the results of a simulation.


Rotisserie baseball, nicknamed roto,[11] proved to be popular despite the difficulties of compiling statistics by hand, which was an early drawback to participation.[12] The traditional statistics used in early rotisserie leagues were often chosen because they were easy to compile from newspaper box scores or weekly information published in USA Today.[citation needed] Okrent credits the idea's rapid spread to the fact that the initial league was created by sports journalists, telling Vanity Fair in 2008 that "most of us in the league were in the media, and we got a lot of press coverage that first season. The second season, there were rotisserie leagues in every Major League press box."[8] According to Okrent, rotisserie baseball afforded sportswriters the opportunity to write about baseball-related material during the 1981 Major League Baseball strike, saying "the writers who were covering baseball had nothing to write about, so they began writing about the teams they had assembled in their own leagues. And that was what popularized it and spread it around very, very widely."[8]


In 1985, the Grandstand Sports Services launched the first nationally available rotisserie baseball leagues online through Q-Link (later America Online).[citation needed] Between 1985 and 1996, the Grandstand continued to improve on the game and the technology by being the first to offer automated drafting, real-time scoring, real-time trading and transactions, and continuous leagues.[citation needed] 041b061a72


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